Developmental Trauma Training for teachers

This year, I embarked on an online professional development programme from Beacon House. Inspired by the findings and clinical knowledge from this cutting edge research, I learned new skills in re-framing the behaviour of troubled children.

This year, I embarked on an online professional development programme from Beacon House. Inspired by the findings and clinical knowledge from this cutting edge research, I learned new skills in re-framing the behaviour of troubled children. In turn, I was able to see the needs of our school community through the lens of Developmental Trauma. 

As an educator and psychotherapist with over twenty five years of experience, I know only too well that professionals trying to support traumatised children within school can sometimes feel de-skilled and overwhelmed. Teacher training programmes, for the most part, do not offer adequate preparation for teachers to grasp the complexities of Developmental Trauma. 

Babies and children who survive multiple experiences of attachment disruption, trauma and separation face profound and complex difficulties, which are often described as ‘depression’, ‘anxiety’, ‘behavioural problems’ or ‘defiance’.” 

 

Beacon House

Developmental Trauma is a set of complex difficulties affecting a child’s sensory systems, dissociative responses, attachment, capacity for regulation, identity and cognitive abilities. By understanding how to identify Developmental Trauma, how to develop a trauma-informed support plan and how to engage dysregulated children, I have experienced a renewed sense of hopefulness and efficacy in creating change for traumatised young people.

As a result of this positive professional development experience, Banff Academy bought licenses for teachers who wanted to participate in this programme. I then co-led Reflective Practice sessions for teachers and learning coaches to see how, as a school community, we could address the needs of our young people. 

Teachers gained confidence in their ability to identify and understand how repeated trauma affects children and adolescents. They understood the breadth and complexity of Developmental Trauma and associated difficulties. Alongside this, they developed their empathic understanding through ideas for experiential learning. In reflective sessions, we explored a range of practical strategies to help regulate distressed children.

This year, we are working in collaboration with the Project–Based Learning staff who will work with our new S1’s. These teachers have been eager to develop a trauma-informed pedagogy.

Our latest articles

Blog

North East Arts Touring – A Unique Collaboration

North East Arts Touring (NEAT) is a Rural Touring Scheme that promotes professional theatre, dance and film screenings in rural venues across the North East of Scotland. It also offers well-being support for vulnerable people.